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Testing the globalization-driven carbon emissions hypothesis: International evidence

Muhammad Shahbaz (), Mantu Mahalik (), Syed Jawad Hussain Shahzad () and Shawkat Hammoudeh

International Economics, 2019, vol. 158, issue C, 25-38

Abstract: We empirically investigate the dynamic relationship between globalization and CO2 emissions for 87 (high, middle and low-income) countries. We utilize the cross-correlation approach to examine the well-known EKC hypothesis between globalization and environmental degradation. The results validate the inverted U-shaped EKC hypothesis for 16 (approximately 18%) from the high- and middle-income countries only, thereby highlighting that a rise in globalization will decrease carbon emissions for these countries in the future. On contrary, the results also confirm the U-shaped relationship between globalization and environmental degradation for 8% of the countries. The remaining countries do not have a U- or an inverted U-shaped relationship between globalization and CO2 emissions. Policy implications are also discussed.

Keywords: Globalization; Carbon emissions; Cross-correlation; EKC (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: F6 Q5 Q0 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2019
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:eee:inteco:v:158:y:2019:i:c:p:25-38

DOI: 10.1016/j.inteco.2019.02.002

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