EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Intended college attendance: Evidence from an experiment on college returns and costs

Zachary Bleemer () and Basit Zafar

Journal of Public Economics, 2018, vol. 157, issue C, 184-211

Abstract: We conduct an information experiment about college returns and costs embedded within a representative survey of US household heads. Baseline perceptions of college costs and benefits are substantially biased, with larger biases among lower-income and non-college households. Respondents are randomly exposed to objective information about average college “returns” or costs. We find a significant impact of the “returns” experiment, persisting in a follow-up survey two months later: intended college attendance expectations increase by about 0.2 of the standard deviation in the baseline likelihood, and gaps by household income or parents’ education decline by 20–30%. We find no impact of the cost information treatment. Further analysis supports the information’s salience, as opposed to information-based updating, as the main channel through which the returns intervention impacts intentions.

Keywords: College enrollment; College returns and costs; Information; Subjective expectations (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: D81 D83 D84 I21 I24 I28 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2018
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (23) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S004727271730186X
Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

Related works:
Working Paper: Intended college attendance: evidence from an experiment on college returns and costs (2015) Downloads
Working Paper: Intended College Attendance: Evidence from an Experiment on College Returns and Cost (2015) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:eee:pubeco:v:157:y:2018:i:c:p:184-211

Access Statistics for this article

Journal of Public Economics is currently edited by R. Boadway and J. Poterba

More articles in Journal of Public Economics from Elsevier
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Dana Niculescu ().

 
Page updated 2019-10-03
Handle: RePEc:eee:pubeco:v:157:y:2018:i:c:p:184-211