EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Culture and diversity in knowledge creation

Marcus Berliant () and Masahisa Fujita

Regional Science and Urban Economics, 2012, vol. 42, issue 4, 648-662

Abstract: Is the paradise of effortless communication the ideal environment for knowledge creation? Or, can the development of local culture in regions raise knowledge productivity compared to a single region with a unitary culture? In other words, can a real technological increase in the cost of collaboration and the cost of public knowledge flow between regions, resulting in cultural differentiation between regions, increase welfare? In our framework, a culture is a set of ideas held exclusively by residents of a location. In general in our model, the equilibrium path generates separate cultures in different regions. When we compare this to the situation where all workers are resident in one region, R&D workers become too homogeneous and there is only one culture. As a result, equilibrium productivity in the creation of new knowledge is lower relative to the situation when there are multiple cultures and workers are more diverse.

Keywords: Knowledge creation; Knowledge diversity; Ideas and culture (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: D83 O31 Z1 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2012
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations View citations in EconPapers (13) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0166046212000233
Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

Related works:
Working Paper: Culture and diversity in knowledge creation (2012) Downloads
Working Paper: Culture and Diversity in Knowledge Creation (2011) Downloads
Working Paper: Culture and diversity in knowledge creation (2011) Downloads
Working Paper: Culture and diversity in knowledge creation (2011) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:eee:regeco:v:42:y:2012:i:4:p:648-662

Access Statistics for this article

Regional Science and Urban Economics is currently edited by D.P McMillen and Y. Zenou

More articles in Regional Science and Urban Economics from Elsevier
Series data maintained by Dana Niculescu ().

 
Page updated 2017-12-06
Handle: RePEc:eee:regeco:v:42:y:2012:i:4:p:648-662