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National health innovation systems: Clustering the OECD countries by innovative output in healthcare using a multi indicator approach

Dorian Proksch, Busch-Casler, Julia, Marcus Max Haberstroh and Andreas Pinkwart

Research Policy, 2019, vol. 48, issue 1, 169-179

Abstract: The importance of innovation in healthcare has increased within the last decades as challenges, like rising costs and an aging demographic, have to be solved. The degree of innovativeness in healthcare is strongly influenced by the National Health Innovation System, which as a sectoral innovation system encompasses a wide variety of actors and related knowledge. Despite the highly practical relevance of the topic, there are only a few studies that analyze innovation in healthcare on a national level. Thus, this study is a starting point and, building on the theoretical framework of national innovation systems, answers the following questions: “Can countries be grouped by their innovation output in healthcare and do those groups differ in factors describing the healthcare system? Do countries with strong national innovation systems also have strong national health innovation systems and vice versa?” We compare the healthcare innovation output of 30 OECD countries using a multi-indicator approach and categorize them into four distinct groups using cluster analysis. The cluster consisting of the Scandinavian countries, the Netherlands and Switzerland shows the highest innovation output measured in knowledge production and knowledge commercialization. Surprisingly, these countries, with the exception of Switzerland, only rank in the medium group when considering the entire national innovation system. Policymakers and researchers might be particularly interested in studying the healthcare systems of these countries.

Keywords: Sectoral innovation systems; National health innovation systems; National innovation systems; Innovation in health; Innovative output in health (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: I1 O3 O5 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2019
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