EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Replication studies in economics—How many and which papers are chosen for replication, and why?

Frank Mueller-Langer (), Benedikt Fecher, Dietmar Harhoff () and Gert Wagner ()

Research Policy, 2019, vol. 48, issue 1, 62-83

Abstract: We investigate how often replication studies are published in empirical economics and what types of journal articles are replicated. We find that between 1974 and 2014 0.1% of publications in the top 50 economics journals were replication studies. We consider the results of published formal replication studies (whether they are negating or reinforcing) and their extent: Narrow replication studies are typically devoted to mere replication of prior work, while scientific replication studies provide a broader analysis. We find evidence that higher-impact articles and articles by authors from leading institutions are more likely to be replicated, whereas the replication probability is lower for articles that appeared in top 5 economics journals. Our analysis also suggests that mandatory data disclosure policies may have a positive effect on the incidence of replication.

Keywords: Replication; Economics of science; Science policy; Economic methodology (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: A1 B4 C12 C13 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2019
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0048733318301847
Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

Related works:
Journal Article: Replication studies in economics—How many and which papers are chosen for replication, and why? (2019) Downloads
Working Paper: Replication Studies in Economics: How Many and Which Papers Are Chosen for Replication, and Why? (2018) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:eee:respol:v:48:y:2019:i:1:p:62-83

Access Statistics for this article

Research Policy is currently edited by M. Bell, B. Martin, W.E. Steinmueller, A. Arora, M. Callon, M. Kenney, S. Kuhlmann, Keun Lee and F. Murray

More articles in Research Policy from Elsevier
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Dana Niculescu ().

 
Page updated 2019-09-30
Handle: RePEc:eee:respol:v:48:y:2019:i:1:p:62-83