EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Threats and opportunities in the digital era: Automation spikes and employment dynamics

Giacomo Domini, Marco Grazzi (), Daniele Moschella () and Tania Treibich ()

Research Policy, 2021, vol. 50, issue 7

Abstract: This paper investigates the change in worker flows (i.e. net growth, but also hiring and separation rates) around an investment in automation-intensive goods and, within firms, across occupational categories. Resorting to an integrated dataset encompassing detailed information on firms, their imports, and employer-employee data for French manufacturing employers over the period 2002–2015, we identify ‘automation spikes’ using imports of capital goods embedding automation technologies. Even after controlling for firms’ non-random selection into automation, we find that automation spikes are linked to an increase in firms’ contemporaneous net employment growth rate, jointly explained by a higher hiring rate and a lower separation rate. Furthermore, we find that automation spikes are not associated with significant changes in the composition of the workforce (in terms of 1-digit and 2-digit occupational categories, and routine-intensive vs. non routine-intensive jobs).

Keywords: Automation; Gross worker flows; Skills; Technological change (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: D25 J23 L25 O33 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2021
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (14) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0048733320302122
Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

Related works:
Working Paper: Threats and opportunities in the digital era: automation spikes and employment dynamics (2019) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:eee:respol:v:50:y:2021:i:7:s0048733320302122

DOI: 10.1016/j.respol.2020.104137

Access Statistics for this article

Research Policy is currently edited by M. Bell, B. Martin, W.E. Steinmueller, A. Arora, M. Callon, M. Kenney, S. Kuhlmann, Keun Lee and F. Murray

More articles in Research Policy from Elsevier
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Catherine Liu ().

 
Page updated 2022-12-02
Handle: RePEc:eee:respol:v:50:y:2021:i:7:s0048733320302122