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Improving scenario methods in infrastructure planning: A case study of long distance travel and mobility in the UK under extreme weather uncertainty and a changing climate

Alberto Zanni, Murray Goulden, Tim Ryley and Robert Dingwall

Technological Forecasting and Social Change, 2017, vol. 115, issue C, 180-197

Abstract: This paper develops a mixed method approach to infrastructure planning through a United Kingdom (UK) case study examining the impact of a changing climate on long distance travel and mobility between London and Glasgow. A novel combination of a qualitative method - Systematic Qualitative Foresight (SQF) - and quantitative simulation using discrete choice stated preference methods is applied. The main dataset is a travel behaviour survey of over 2000 residents of London and Glasgow. Three illustrative SQF-based scenarios are developed incorporating society, technology and climate dimensions. For each scenario, the choice of long-distance travel mode by two groups of respondents generated by cluster analysis is simulated using stated preference survey data to describe the choices likely to be made by actors within each scenario.

Keywords: Resilience; Climate; Transport; Technology; Discrete choice; Scenarios (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2017
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