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Intermediate institutions and technology transfer in developing countries: The case of the construction industry in Ghana

Ellis L.C. Osabutey and Richard Croucher

Technological Forecasting and Social Change, 2018, vol. 128, issue C, 154-163

Abstract: There has been an emerging view that the quality of state institutions can influence technology transfer in host countries. The bulk of such studies have ignored the role of intermediate institutions which bridge government and industry. We compare academic and local expert views of how technology and knowledge (T&K) transfer could be enhanced in the developing world, taking the Ghanaian construction industry as an exemplar. The academic argument that the development of strong intermediate institutions is likely to improve T&K policy and practice is explicated. We then investigate expert perceptions of the industry's T&K transfer problems and their proposed solutions. Their views confirm, but also develop and nuance academic research by suggesting that certain types of intermediate institutions have a more significant role to play than others.

Keywords: Intermediate institutions; Technology transfer; Industry associations; Professional bodies; Ghana; Africa (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2018
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:eee:tefoso:v:128:y:2018:i:c:p:154-163

DOI: 10.1016/j.techfore.2017.11.014

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