EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Socio-spatial scales as social boundaries? Or: How do migration studies profit from including ‘space’ in the sociology of social boundaries

Anna Amelina
Additional contact information
Anna Amelina: 1Faculty of Sociology, Bielefeld University, Germany

Migration Letters, 2012, vol. 9, issue 3, 273-288

Abstract: Starting from the critique of methodological nationalism the article questions the conventional limitation of migration studies on social inequalities imposed by the nation state context. First, it highlights the conceptual shortcomings of assimilation approaches which mainly analyse hierarchies of social positions within the settings of the immigration countries. Second, it reviews migration research which addresses inequality patterns at the global and the transnational scale. It analyses both bodies of literature which have in common their inability to explicitly address the interaction between particular socio-spatial scales. This is the reason for the necessity to include the scale approach in migration studies. Moreover, to adopt the scale theory into inequality research, spatial scales, such as the global and local, the national and transnational must be re-conceptualized in terms of the social boundaries approach. In sum, the article exemplifies how migration studies on social hierarchies profit from under-standing ‘space’ as a distinct set of categorical distinctions powerful in social practice.

Keywords: methodological nationalism; scale approach; categorical distinctions; social boundaries; social inequalities (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2012
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (1) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
https://journal.tplondon.com/index.php/ml/article/viewFile/164/148 (application/pdf)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:mig:journl:v:9:y:2012:i:3:p:273-288

Ordering information: This journal article can be ordered from
https://journals.tpl ... ormation/librarians/

Access Statistics for this article

Migration Letters is currently edited by Prof Ibrahim Sirkeci, Prof Dr Jeffrey H. Cohen and Prof Elli Heikkila

More articles in Migration Letters from Transnational Press London, UK
Bibliographic data for series maintained by TPLondon ().

 
Page updated 2020-12-31
Handle: RePEc:mig:journl:v:9:y:2012:i:3:p:273-288