EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Role of Access to Credit in Rice Production in Sub-Saharan Africa: The Case of Mwea Irrigation Scheme in Kenya

Timothy Njeru (), Yukichi Mano () and Keijiro Otsuka ()

Journal of African Economies, 2016, vol. 25, issue 2, 300-321

Abstract: This study explores the role of access to credit in improving rice production in Sub-Saharan Africa using the case of rice farmers in the large-scale Mwea irrigation scheme in Kenya. Using household level survey data, we find that the use of fertiliser and paddy yield per hectare are not significantly different among borrowers from the cooperative society, borrowers from rice traders and non-borrowers. However, borrowers from rice traders receive lower incomes and profits compared with non-borrowers largely due to the higher interest charged. Considering that such farmers who borrow from rice traders are generally poorer in financial, physical, and human capital and would have even made lower income and profit without rice trader credit, we suggest policies to facilitate further development of credit markets for both efficiency and equity of rice production in Mwea.

Date: 2016
References: Add references at CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (7) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/jae/ejv024 (application/pdf)
Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

Related works:
Working Paper: Role of Access to Credit in Rice Production in Sub Saharan Africa: The Case of Mwea Irrigation Scheme in Kenya (2015) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:oup:jafrec:v:25:y:2016:i:2:p:300-321.

Ordering information: This journal article can be ordered from
http://www.oup.co.uk/journals

Access Statistics for this article

Journal of African Economies is currently edited by Marcel Fafchamps

More articles in Journal of African Economies from Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE) Oxford University Press, Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, UK. Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Oxford University Press ().

 
Page updated 2019-12-12
Handle: RePEc:oup:jafrec:v:25:y:2016:i:2:p:300-321.