EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Children of a (Policy) Revolution: The Introduction of Universal Child Care and Its Effect on Fertility

Stefan Bauernschuster, Timo Hener and Helmut Rainer ()

Journal of the European Economic Association, 2016, vol. 14, issue 4, 975-1005

Abstract: What role does affordable and widely available public child care play for fertility? We exploit a major German reform generating large temporal and spatial variation in child care coverage for children under the age of three. Our precise and robust estimates on birth register data reveal that increases in public child care have significant positive effects on fertility. The fertility effects are more pronounced at the intensive than at the extensive margin, and are not driven by changes in the timing of births or selective migration. Our findings inform policy makers concerned about low fertility by suggesting that universal early child care holds the promise of being an effective means of increasing birth rates.

JEL-codes: J13 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2016
References: Add references at CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (17) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/jeea.12158 (application/pdf)
Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

Related works:
Journal Article: CHILDREN OF A (POLICY) REVOLUTION: THE INTRODUCTION OF UNIVERSAL CHILD CARE AND ITS EFFECT ON FERTILITY (2016) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:oup:jeurec:v:14:y:2016:i:4:p:975-1005.

Access Statistics for this article

More articles in Journal of the European Economic Association from European Economic Association Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Oxford University Press ().

 
Page updated 2020-03-31
Handle: RePEc:oup:jeurec:v:14:y:2016:i:4:p:975-1005.