EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Friendship network composition and subjective well-being

Sefa Awaworyi Churchill and Russell Smyth

Oxford Economic Papers, 2020, vol. 72, issue 1, 191-215

Abstract: Using data from the UK’s Community Life Survey, we present the first study to examine the relationship between heterogeneity in one’s friendship network and subjective well-being. We measure network heterogeneity by the extent to which one’s friends are similar to oneself with regard to ethnicity and religion. We find that people who have friendship networks with characteristics dissimilar to themselves have lower levels of subjective well-being. Specifically, our two-stage least squares (2SLS) estimates, using measures of ethnic and religious diversity based on the Herfindahl-type fractionalization index that are flipped between adjoining rural/urban areas as instruments, suggest that a standard deviation increase in the proportion of one’s friends from different ethnic (religious) groups is associated with a decrease of 0.276 (0.451) standard deviations in subjective well-being.

JEL-codes: I31 J15 Z12 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2020
References: Add references at CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (2)

Downloads: (external link)
http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/oep/gpz019 (application/pdf)
Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

Related works:
Working Paper: Friendship network composition and subjective wellbeing (2017) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:72:y:2020:i:1:p:191-215.

Ordering information: This journal article can be ordered from
https://academic.oup.com/journals

Access Statistics for this article

Oxford Economic Papers is currently edited by James Forder and Francis J. Teal

More articles in Oxford Economic Papers from Oxford University Press Oxford University Press, Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, UK.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Oxford University Press ().

 
Page updated 2024-03-31
Handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:72:y:2020:i:1:p:191-215.