EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Implications of Skill-Biased Technological Change: International Evidence

Eli Bekman, John Bound and Stephen Machin ()

The Quarterly Journal of Economics, 1998, vol. 113, issue 4, 1245-1279

Abstract: Demand for less-skilled workers plummeted in developed countries in the 1980s. In open economies, pervasive skill-biased technological change (SBTC) can explain this decline. SBTC tends to increase the domestic supply of unskill-intensive goods by releasing less-skilled labor. The more countries experiencing a SBTC, the greater its potential to decrease the relative wages of less-skilled labor by increasing the world supply of unskill-intensive goods. We find strong evidence for pervasive SBTC in developed countries. Most industries increased the proportion of skilled workers despite generally rising or stable relative wages. Moreover, the same manufacturing industries simultaneously increased demand for skills in different countries. Many developing countries also show increased skill premiums, a pattern consistent with SBTC.

Date: 1998
References: Add references at CitEc
Citations View citations in EconPapers (403) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://hdl.handle.net/10.1162/003355398555892 (application/pdf)
Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

Related works:
Working Paper: Implications of Skill-Biased Technological Change: International Evidence (1997) Downloads
Working Paper: Implications of skill-biased technological change: international evidence (1997) Downloads
Working Paper: Implications of Skill-Biased Technological Change: International Evidence (1997)
Working Paper: Implications of Skill-Biased Technological Change: International Evidence (1997)
Working Paper: Implications of Skill-Biased Technological Change: International Evidence (1997)
Working Paper: Implications of Skill-Biased Technological Change: International Evidence (1997) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:oup:qjecon:v:113:y:1998:i:4:p:1245-1279.

Access Statistics for this article

The Quarterly Journal of Economics is currently edited by Robert J. Barro, Elhanan Helpman, Lawrence F. Katz and Andrei Schleifer

More articles in The Quarterly Journal of Economics from Oxford University Press
Series data maintained by Oxford University Press ().

 
Page updated 2017-09-29
Handle: RePEc:oup:qjecon:v:113:y:1998:i:4:p:1245-1279.