EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Implications of Skill-Biased Technological Change: International Evidence

Eli Berman (), John Bound and Stephen Machin ()

Working Papers from Centre for Economic Performance & Institute of Economics

Abstract: Demand for less skilled workers decreased dramatically in the US and in other developed countries over the past two decades. We argue that pervasive skill biased technological change rather than increased trade with the developing world is the principal culprit. The pervasiveness of this technological change is important for two reasons. First, it is an immediate and testable impication of technologiacl change. Second, under standard assumptions, the more pervasive the skill biased technologiacl change the greater the increase in the embodied supply of less skilled workers and the greater the depressing effect on their relative wages through world goods prices.

Keywords: TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE; LABOUR (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: O3 O33 J3 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 1997
References: Add references at CitEc
Citations View citations in EconPapers (23) Track citations by RSS feed

There are no downloads for this item, see the EconPapers FAQ for hints about obtaining it.

Related works:
Journal Article: Implications of Skill-Biased Technological Change: International Evidence (1998) Downloads
Working Paper: Implications of Skill-Biased Technological Change: International Evidence (1997) Downloads
Working Paper: Implications of skill-biased technological change: international evidence (1997) Downloads
Working Paper: Implications of Skill-Biased Technological Change: International Evidence (1997)
Working Paper: Implications of Skill-Biased Technological Change: International Evidence (1997)
Working Paper: Implications of Skill-Biased Technological Change: International Evidence (1997) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:fth:cepies:25

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Working Papers from Centre for Economic Performance & Institute of Economics United Kingdom; Centre for Economic Performance & Institute of Economics and Statistics, Oxford University. Manor Road. Oxford OX1 3Ul. Contact information at EDIRC.
Series data maintained by Thomas Krichel ().

 
Page updated 2017-09-29
Handle: RePEc:fth:cepies:25