EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Growing up in a Recession

Paola Giuliano () and Antonio Spilimbergo ()

Review of Economic Studies, 2014, vol. 81, issue 2, 787-817

Abstract: Does the historical macroeconomic environment affect preferences for redistribution? We find that individuals who experienced a recession when young believe that success in life depends more on luck than effort, support more government redistribution, and tend to vote for left-wing parties. The effect of recessions on beliefs is long-lasting. We support our findings with evidence from three different datasets. First, we identify the effect of recessions on beliefs exploiting time and regional variation in macroeconomic conditions using data from the 1972 to 2010 General Social Survey. Our specifications control for nonlinear time-period, life-cycle, and cohort effects, as well as a host of background variables. Second, we rely on data from the National Longitudinal Survey of the High School Class of 1972 to corroborate the age–period–cohort specification and look at heterogeneous effects of experiencing a recession during early adulthood. Third, using data from the World Value Survey, we confirm our findings with a sample of 37 countries whose citizens experienced macroeconomic disasters at different points in history.

Date: 2014
References: Add references at CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (113) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/restud/rdt040 (application/pdf)
Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:oup:restud:v:81:y:2014:i:2:p:787-817

Access Statistics for this article

Review of Economic Studies is currently edited by Andrea PratEditor-Name: Bruno BiaisEditor-Name: Kjetil StoreslettenEditor-Name: Enrique Sentana

More articles in Review of Economic Studies from Oxford University Press
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Oxford University Press ().

 
Page updated 2019-12-10
Handle: RePEc:oup:restud:v:81:y:2014:i:2:p:787-817