EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

The Consequences of the "Missing Girls" of China

Avraham Ebenstein and Ethan Jennings Sharygin

World Bank Economic Review, 2009, vol. 23, issue 3, 399-425

Abstract: In the wake of the one-child policy of 1979, China experienced an unprecedented rise in the sex ratio at birth (ratio of male to female births). In cohorts born between 1980 and 2000, there were 22 million more men than women. Some 10.4 percent of these additional men will fail to marry, based on simulations presented here that assess how different scenarios for the sex ratio at birth affect the probability of failure to marry in 21st century China. Three consequences of the high sex ratio and large numbers of unmarried men are discussed: the prevalence of prostitution and sexually transmitted infections, the economic and physical well-being of men who fail to marry, and China's ability to care for its elderly, with a particular focus on elderly males who fail to marry. Several policy options are suggested that could mitigate the negative consequences of the demographic squeeze. Copyright The Author 2009. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development / the world bank . All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oxfordjournals.org, Oxford University Press.

Date: 2009
References: Add references at CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (13) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/wber/lhp012 (application/pdf)
Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:oup:wbecrv:v:23:y:2009:i:3:p:399-425

Ordering information: This journal article can be ordered from
http://www.oup.co.uk/journals

Access Statistics for this article

World Bank Economic Review is currently edited by Jaime de Melo

More articles in World Bank Economic Review from World Bank Group Oxford University Press, Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, UK. Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Oxford University Press ().

 
Page updated 2020-09-20
Handle: RePEc:oup:wbecrv:v:23:y:2009:i:3:p:399-425