EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

How Immigrants Fare across the Earnings Distribution in Australia and the United States

Barry Chiswick (), Anh Le and Paul Miller

ILR Review, 2008, vol. 61, issue 3, 353-373

Abstract: This paper investigates determinants of the earnings distribution for native-born workers and immigrant workers in two countries. The authors, using data from the 2000 U.S. Census and 2001 Australian Census, employ a methodology (quantile regression) that facilitates measurement of the native-born/immigrant earnings differential and the partial effect of explanatory variables such as schooling and experience at each decile of the earnings distribution. They find evidence that schooling and labor market experience had stronger earnings effects at higher deciles. The native/immigrant earnings gap varied by decile, and in particular increased in the United States at higher deciles. The results suggest that in the United States minimum wages compressed earnings at low deciles, whereas in Australia the minimum (administered) wage system compressed earnings across the entire distribution. A pattern of higher earnings for immigrants than for the native-born at the lowest earnings decile in Australia may reflect favorable selectivity in migration.

Date: 2008
References: Add references at CitEc
Citations View citations in EconPapers (16) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://ilr.sagepub.com/content/61/3/353.abstract (text/html)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:sae:ilrrev:v:61:y:2008:i:3:p:353-373

Access Statistics for this article

More articles in ILR Review from Cornell University, ILR School
Bibliographic data for series maintained by SAGE Publications ().

 
Page updated 2018-09-14
Handle: RePEc:sae:ilrrev:v:61:y:2008:i:3:p:353-373