EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

The signalling value of education across genders

Ulf Nielsson () and Herdis Steingrimsdottir ()

Empirical Economics, 2018, vol. 54, issue 4, 1827-1854

Abstract: Abstract This study examines gender discrimination and the possibility that education is more important for signalling ability among women than men. As social networks tend to run along gender lines and managers in the labour market are predominantly male, it may be more difficult for women to signal their ability without college credentials. The Lang and Manove (Am Econ Rev 101(4):1467–1496, 2011) model of racial discrimination and educational sorting is applied to examine the gender gap in schooling attainment. The model is empirically estimated for whites, blacks and Hispanics separately, with the results among whites consistent with education being more valuable to women due to signalling. For 90% of the whites in the sample women choose a higher level of education, given their ability, than men. Women on average obtain 0.5–0.7 extra years of schooling compared to men with the same ability score.

Keywords: Education; Ability; Signalling; Gender; Race (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: I24 I26 J71 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2018
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00181-017-1264-z Abstract (text/html)
Access to the full text of the articles in this series is restricted.

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:spr:empeco:v:54:y:2018:i:4:d:10.1007_s00181-017-1264-z

Ordering information: This journal article can be ordered from
http://www.springer. ... rics/journal/181/PS2

Access Statistics for this article

Empirical Economics is currently edited by Robert M. Kunst, Badi H. Baltagi, Bertrand Candelon, Subal C. Kumbhakar and Michael Lechner

More articles in Empirical Economics from Springer
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Sonal Shukla ().

 
Page updated 2019-02-06
Handle: RePEc:spr:empeco:v:54:y:2018:i:4:d:10.1007_s00181-017-1264-z