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GENDER DIFFERENCES IN VOCATIONAL SCHOOL TRAINING AND EARNINGS PREMIUMS IN TAIWAN

Yana Rodgers (), Joseph Zveglich and Laura Wherry ()

Feminist Economics, 2006, vol. 12, issue 4, 527-560

Abstract: International capital mobility and economic restructuring have brought training and skills acquisition to the forefront of policy dialogues. Taiwan has gone beyond most countries in promoting vocational education and setting strict quotas for schooling. Although the education plans do not have separate targets for men and women, they have gendered outcomes. Estimates of earnings premiums using ordinary least squares and quantile regression techniques indicate that only men have gained consistently higher premiums from vocational school compared to general schooling. Women who were denied access to the university system have forgone college premiums that exceed those of men. Also, the commerce track, in which women cluster, yields an earnings penalty compared to general schooling, while the technical track, in which men predominate, yields an earnings premium. Policy reforms based on relaxing education quotas and enforcing equal opportunity legislation would provide women with more rewarding education and career options.

Keywords: Education; skills; segregation; wage gap; Taiwan; quantile regression; JEL Codes: J24; O2; J31 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2006
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DOI: 10.1080/13545700600885313

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