EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Does Higher Income Make You More Altruistic? Evidence from the Holocaust

Mitchell Hoffman

The Review of Economics and Statistics, 2011, vol. 93, issue 3, 876-887

Abstract: This paper considers the decision of Gentiles whether to rescue Jews during the Holocaust, a situation of altruistic behavior under life-or-death stakes. I examine the role to which economic factors may have influenced the decision to be a rescuer. Using cross-country data and detailed individual-level data on rescuers and nonrescuers, I find that richer countries had many more rescuers than poorer ones, and within countries, richer people were more likely to be rescuers than poorer people. The individual-level effect of income on being a rescuer remains significant after controlling for ease-of-rescue variables, such as the number of rooms in one's home, suggesting that the correlation of income and rescue is not solely driven by richer people having more resources for rescue. Given that richer people might be thought to have more to lose by rescuing, the evidence is consistent with the view that altruism increases with income. © 2011 The President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Date: 2011
References: Add references at CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (7) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/pdf/10.1162/REST_a_00087 link to full text (application/pdf)
Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:tpr:restat:v:93:y:2011:i:3:p:876-887

Ordering information: This journal article can be ordered from
https://mitpressjour ... rnal/?issn=0034-6535

Access Statistics for this article

The Review of Economics and Statistics is currently edited by Amitabh Chandra, Olivier Coibion, Bryan S. Graham, Shachar Kariv, Amit K. Khandelwal, Asim Ijaz Khwaja, Brigitte C. Madrian and Rohini Pande

More articles in The Review of Economics and Statistics from MIT Press
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Ann Olson ().

 
Page updated 2020-01-24
Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:93:y:2011:i:3:p:876-887