EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Going to War and Going to College: Did World War II and the G.I. Bill Increase Educational Attainment for Returning Veterans?

John Bound and Sarah Turner ()

Journal of Labor Economics, 2002, vol. 20, issue 4, 784-815

Abstract: The flood of veterans enrolling in college at the end of World War II contributed to widespread rhetoric that the G.I. Bill brought about the "democratization" of American higher education. Whether military service, combined with educational benefits, led World War II veterans to increase their investments in college has received little research attention. Our estimation strategy focuses on between-cohort differences in military service, and we use census data to compare the collegiate attainment of veterans and nonveterans. The net effect of military service and G.I. benefits was substantial gains in the collegiate attainment of World War II veterans.

Date: 2002
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations View citations in EconPapers (94) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/342012 main text (application/pdf)
Access to the online full text or PDF requires a subscription.

Related works:
Working Paper: Going to War and Going to College: Did World War II and the G.I. Bill Increase Educational Attainment for Returning Veterans? (1999) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:20:y:2002:i:4:p:784-815

Access Statistics for this article

More articles in Journal of Labor Economics from University of Chicago Press
Series data maintained by Journals Division ().

 
Page updated 2017-09-29
Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:20:y:2002:i:4:p:784-815