EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Self-Reported Versus Objective Measures of Health in Retirement Models

John Bound

Journal of Human Resources, 1991, vol. 26, issue 1, 106-138

Abstract: Labor supply models are sensitive to the measures of health used. When self-reported measures are used, health seems to play a larger role and economic factors a smaller one than when more objective measures are used. While this may indicate biases inherent in using self-reported measures, there are reasons to be suspicious of more objective measures as well. A statistical model incorporating both self-reported and objective measures of health shows the potential biases involved in using either measure or in using one to instrument the other. The model is initially unidentified, but incorporating outside information on the validity of self-reported measures confirms fears about both the self-reported and objective measures available on such data sets as the Retirement History Survey or the National Longitudinal Survey of Older Men.

Date: 1991
References: Add references at CitEc
Citations View citations in EconPapers (350) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdfplus/145718
A subscripton is required to access pdf files. Pay per article is available.

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:26:y:1991:i:1:p:106-138

Access Statistics for this article

More articles in Journal of Human Resources from University of Wisconsin Press
Series data maintained by ().

 
Page updated 2017-12-12
Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:26:y:1991:i:1:p:106-138