EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

BUSINESS MODEL INNOVATIONS FOR ELECTRIC MOBILITY — WHAT CAN BE LEARNED FROM EXISTING BUSINESS MODEL PATTERNS?

Nizar Abdelkafi (), Sergiy Makhotin () and Thorsten Posselt ()
Additional contact information
Nizar Abdelkafi: Fraunhofer Center for Central and Eastern Europe and Department of Innovation Management and Innovation Economics, University of Leipzig, Grimmaische Straße 1204109, Leipzig, Germany
Sergiy Makhotin: Fraunhofer Center for Central and Eastern Europe and Department of Innovation Management and Innovation Economics, University of Leipzig, Grimmaische Straße 1204109, Leipzig, Germany
Thorsten Posselt: Fraunhofer Center for Central and Eastern Europe and Department of Innovation Management and Innovation Economics, University of Leipzig, Grimmaische Straße 1204109, Leipzig, Germany

International Journal of Innovation Management (ijim), 2013, vol. 17, issue 01, 1-41

Abstract: The paper aims to generate systematically business model innovations in the field of electric mobility. It introduces a new framework, in which a business model denotes a value-focused concept with five value dimensions: value proposition, value communication, value creation, value delivery and value capture. The framework enables the classification of business model patterns, identified in the literature, according to five categories. The combination of patterns from different dimensions can lead to the systematic generation of business model innovations. But the number of business models that can result from pattern combinations can be overwhelming. Subsequently, the paper only evaluates the extent to which business model patterns that are not necessarily observed in the automotive sector can be useful for the field of electric mobility, and how they can be adapted to fit into the new context. We find that the transferability strongly depends on the actor's role in the system, if it is a manufacturer, supplier or service provider. More importantly, our analysis shows that some models such as product-to-service (e.g., car sharing service), already implemented in the automotive industry, will continue to be successful in the future because of their potential of increasing customer acceptance and technology diffusion. Many other business models — so far used in other sectors, but not in the automotive industry — may integrate the field of electric mobility. Razor and blades, own the undesirable concept, and leverage new influencers are all promising business models, if they can be fitted adequately to the new context induced by the new technology.

Keywords: Business model innovation; electric mobility; business model patterns; technological development (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2013
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (11) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.worldscientific.com/doi/abs/10.1142/S1363919613400033
Access to full text is restricted to subscribers

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:wsi:ijimxx:v:17:y:2013:i:01:n:s1363919613400033

Ordering information: This journal article can be ordered from

DOI: 10.1142/S1363919613400033

Access Statistics for this article

International Journal of Innovation Management (ijim) is currently edited by Joe Tidd

More articles in International Journal of Innovation Management (ijim) from World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Tai Tone Lim ().

 
Page updated 2020-10-20
Handle: RePEc:wsi:ijimxx:v:17:y:2013:i:01:n:s1363919613400033