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Parental Time, Role Strain, and Children’s Fat Intake and Obesity-Related Outcomes

Alex McIntosh, George Davis, Rodolfo Nayga, Jenna Anding, Cruz Torres, Karen Kubena, Ernesto Perusquia, Genevieve Yeley and Wen You

No 291994, Contractor and Cooperator Reports from United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service

Abstract: This study uses a unique dataset to examine parental influence on children’s dietary intake and whether or not the children will become obese. The study shows that household income, parents’ time spent with children, and parents’ work experiences significantly affect children’s energy and fat intake and obesity-related outcomes. For example, the more time mothers spent with their children, the lower the children’s Body Mass Index (BMI) was. On the other hand, the more time fathers spent with their children, the higher the children’s BMI was. And the more time both fathers and mothers spent with their children, the higher their children’s fat intake (as a percentage of energy) was. In general, mothers tended to have a greater effect on their children’s dietary intake than fathers did. Both parents seemed to influence children ages 9-11 more than they did children ages 13-15.

Keywords: Consumer/Household Economics; Health Economics and Policy (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 263
Date: 2006-06
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:ags:uerscc:291994

DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.291994

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