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Where Households Get Food in a Typical Week: Findings From USDA's FoodAPS

Jessica Todd () and Benjamin Scharadin

No 242450, Economic Information Bulletin from United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service

Abstract: Understanding where U.S. households acquire food, what they acquire, and what they pay is essential to identifying which food and nutrition policies might improve diet quality. USDA’s National Household Food Acquisition and Purchase Survey (FoodAPS) provides a complete picture of where households acquire food, what they acquire, and how much they pay during a 7-day period in 2012. Nearly all households acquire food at least once during the week; 87 percent visited large grocery stores and supermarkets, and 85 percent visited restaurants and other eating places at least once. Households acquired food at no cost on 22 percent of occasions, and these events occurred mainly at food pantries/Meals on Wheels, schools, meals with family or friends, community events, and workplaces.

Keywords: Agricultural and Food Policy; Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety; Food Security and Poverty; Health Economics and Policy (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 33
Date: 2016-07
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-agr and nep-edu
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:ags:uersib:242450

DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.242450

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