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Communicating with Farmers through Social Networks

Ariel BenYishay and Ahmed Mobarak ()

No 156233, Center Discussion Papers from Yale University, Economic Growth Center

Abstract: Low adoption of productive agricultural technologies is a puzzle. Agricultural extension services rely on external agents to communicate with farmers, although social networks are known to be the most credible source of information about new technologies. We conduct a large-scale field experiment on communication strategies in which extension workers are partnered with different members of social networks. We show that communicator actions and effort are susceptible to small performance incentives, and adoption rates vary by communicator type. Communicators who face conditions most comparable to target farmers are the most persuasive. Incorporating communication dynamics can enrich the literature on social learning.

Keywords: Environmental Economics and Policy; International Development; Marketing; Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies; Teaching/Communication/Extension/Profession (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 61
Date: 2013-08
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http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/156233/files/cdp1030.pdf (application/pdf)

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Working Paper: Communicating with Farmers through Social Networks (2013) Downloads
Working Paper: Communicating with Farmers through Social Networks (2013) Downloads
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:ags:yaleeg:156233

DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.156233

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