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Scaring or scarring? Labour market effects of criminal victimisation

Anna Bindler and Nadine Ketel ()

No 30, ECONtribute Discussion Papers Series from University of Bonn and University of Cologne, Germany

Abstract: Little is known about the costs of crime to victims. We use unique and detailed register data on victimisations and monthly labour market outcomes from the Netherlands and estimate event-study designs to assess short- and long-term effects of criminal victimisation. Across offences, both males and females experience significant decreases in earnings (up to -12.9%) and increases in benefit receipt (up to +6%) after victimisation. The negative labour market responses are lasting (up to four years) and accompanied by shorter-lived responses in health expenditure. Additional analyses suggest that the victimisation is a life-changing event leading to escalation points in victims’ lives.

Keywords: Crime; victimisation; labour market outcomes; event-study design (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: K4 J01 J12 I1 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 57 pages
Date: 2020-09
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-hea, nep-isf, nep-lab, nep-law and nep-ure
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https://www.econtribute.de/RePEc/ajk/ajkdps/ECONtribute_030_2020.pdf First version, 2020 (application/pdf)

Related works:
Working Paper: Scaring or scarring? Labour market effects of criminal victimisation (2019) Downloads
Working Paper: Scaring or scarring? Labour market effects of criminal victimisation (2019) Downloads
Working Paper: Scaring or Scarring? Labour Market Effects of Criminal Victimisation (2019) Downloads
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:ajk:ajkdps:030

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