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Flying Airplanes: Realizing Circadian Effects (FARCE)

David Dickinson and Todd McElroy

No 09-16, Working Papers from Department of Economics, Appalachian State University

Abstract: People differ in their diurnal (time-of-day) preferences—some are morning-types and others are evening-types. These differences are explored in a unique experiment design in which subjects are randomly assigned to produce paper airplanes at either 8:00 a.m. or 10:00 p.m. Our results show that evening-types at their more optimal time-of-day (10:00 p.m.) produce planes that fly statistically significantly farther than those produced by morning-types at their more optimal time-of-day (8:00 a.m.). Evidence also indicates that planes produced by evening-types fly straighter. These results have implications for hiring practices and shift work design in aeronautical engineering and aircraft production. Key Words:

JEL-codes: C9 J22 J24 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2009
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-cbe and nep-exp
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