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Lockdown Strategies, Mobility Patterns and COVID-19

Nikos Askitas (), Konstantinos Tatsiramos () and Bertrand Verheyden

Papers from arXiv.org

Abstract: We develop a multiple-events model and exploit within and between country variation in the timing, type and level of intensity of various public policies to study their dynamic effects on the daily incidence of COVID-19 and on population mobility patterns across 135 countries. We remove concurrent policy bias by taking into account the contemporaneous presence of multiple interventions. The main result of the paper is that cancelling public events and imposing restrictions on private gatherings followed by school closures have quantitatively the most pronounced effects on reducing the daily incidence of COVID-19. They are followed by workplace as well as stay-at-home requirements, whose statistical significance and levels of effect are not as pronounced. Instead, we find no effects for international travel controls, public transport closures and restrictions on movements across cities and regions. We establish that these findings are mediated by their effect on population mobility patterns in a manner consistent with time-use and epidemiological factors.

Date: 2020-05
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-ure
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Published in Nature Journal: Scientific Reports 2021

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http://arxiv.org/pdf/2006.00531 Latest version (application/pdf)

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Working Paper: Lockdown Strategies, Mobility Patterns and Covid-19 (2020) Downloads
Working Paper: Lockdown Strategies, Mobility Patterns and COVID-19 (2020) Downloads
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