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Hours of Work and Gender Identity: Does Part-time Work Make the Family Happier?

Alison Booth () and Jan van Ours ()

No 507, CEPR Discussion Papers from Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University

Abstract: Taking into account inter-dependence within the family, we investigate the relationship between part-time work and happiness. We use panel data from the new Household, Income and Labor Dynamics in Australia Survey. Our analysis indicates that part-time women are more satisfied with working hours than full-time women. Partnered women’s life satisfaction is increased if their partners work full-time. Male partners’ life satisfaction is unaffected by their partners’ market hours but is increased if they themselves are working full-time. This finding is consistent with the gender identity hypothesis of Akerlof and Kranton (2000).

Keywords: part-time work; happiness; gender identity. (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: J22 I31 J16 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 38 pages
Date: 2005-12
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-lab, nep-ltv and nep-soc
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (5) Track citations by RSS feed

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https://www.cbe.anu.edu.au/researchpapers/cepr/DP507.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
Journal Article: Hours of Work and Gender Identity: Does Part‐time Work Make the Family Happier? (2009) Downloads
Working Paper: Hours of Work and Gender Identity: Does Part-time Work make the Family Happier? (2006) Downloads
Working Paper: Hours of Work and Gender Identity: Does Part-Time Work Make the Family Happier? (2005) Downloads
Working Paper: Hours of Work and Gender Identity: Does Part-Time Work Make the Family Happier? (2005) Downloads
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:auu:dpaper:507

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