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On the Evolution of Multiple Jobholding in Canada

Olena Kostyshyna and Etienne Lalé ()

Staff Working Papers from Bank of Canada

Abstract: The number of workers who hold more than one job (a.k.a. multiple jobholders) has increased recently in Canada. While this seems to echo the view that non-standard work arrangements are becoming pervasive, the increase has in fact been trivial compared with the long-run rise of multiple jobholding that has occurred since the mid-1970s. In this paper, we document this historical evolution and provide a comprehensive account of its underlying dynamics. To this end, we use restricted-access panel micro-data from the Canadian Labour Force Survey to construct transition probabilities into and out of multiple jobholding. We analyze these data through the lens of a trend decomposition that separates out the role of labor market inflows and outflows. The picture that emerges from our analysis is one of continued increases in the propensity of workers to take on second jobs. We argue that changes in technology and in preferences could both be responsible for this evolution.

Keywords: Econometric and statistical methods; Labour markets (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: E24 J21 J22 J60 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 47 pages
Date: 2019-12
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-his, nep-lma and nep-mac
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:bca:bocawp:19-49

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