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Voting Behaviour and Public Employment in Nazi Germany

Stephan Maurer

CEP Discussion Papers from Centre for Economic Performance, LSE

Abstract: This paper analyses whether the German National Socialists used economic policies to reward their voters after their rise to power in 1933. Using data on public employment in the armed forces, public administrations and related professions from the German occupational censuses in 1925, 1933 and 1939 and addressing the potential endogeneity of the National Socialist vote share in 1933 by way of an instrumental variables strategy based on a similar party in Imperial Germany 1912, I find that cities with higher National Socialist vote shares experienced a relative increase in public employment: for every additional percentage point in the vote share, the number of public employment jobs increased by around 3.5 percent. When measured relative to the total population, a one standard-deviation increase in the 1933 vote share led to an increase in the share of public employment of a quarter of a standard deviation.

Keywords: Political connections; public employment; political economy; Nazi regime (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: D72 D73 N44 N94 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2015-02
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http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/dp1326.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
Journal Article: Voting Behavior and Public Employment in Nazi Germany (2018) Downloads
Working Paper: Voting behavior and public employment in Nazi Germany (2018) Downloads
Working Paper: Voting behaviour and public employment in Nazi Germany (2015) Downloads
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