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Gender and Promotions: Evidence from Academic Economists in France

Clement Bosquet (), Pierre-Philippe Combes () and Cecilia Garcia-Penalosa ()

CEP Discussion Papers from Centre for Economic Performance, LSE

Abstract: The promotion system for French academic economists provides an interesting environment to examine the promotion gap between men and women. Promotions occur through national competitions for which we have information both on candidates and on those eligible to be candidates. We can then examine the two stages of the process: application and success. Women are less likely to seek promotion and this accounts for up to 76% of the promotion gap. Being a woman also reduces the probability of promotion conditional on applying, although the gender difference is not statistically significant. Our results highlight the importance of the decision to apply.

Keywords: gender gaps; promotions; academic labour markets (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: J16 J7 I23 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-dem, nep-gen, nep-hme, nep-lab and nep-ltv
Date: 2017-11
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Related works:
Working Paper: Gender and Promotions: Evidence from Academic Economists in France (2018) Downloads
Working Paper: Gender and promotions: evidence from academic economists in France (2017) Downloads
Working Paper: Gender and Promotions: Evidence from Academic Economists in France (2014) Downloads
Working Paper: Gender and Competition: Evidence from Academic Promotions in France (2013) Downloads
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