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Unequal learning and labour market losses in the crisis: consequences for social mobility

Lee Elliot Major, Andrew Eyles and Stephen Machin ()

CEP Discussion Papers from Centre for Economic Performance, LSE

Abstract: The unequal learning and labour market losses arising in the UK due to the Covid-19 pandemic are used to assess the consequences for social mobility. Labour market and learning losses have been more pronounced for people from poorer families and this is incorporated into a generalisation of the standard, canonical social mobility model. A calibration shows a significantly higher intergenerational elasticity - reflecting lower social mobility - because of the uneven nature of losses by family income, and from dynamic scarring. Results from a randomised information experiment incorporated in a bespoke Social Mobility Survey corroborate this, as participants become more sceptical about the social mobility prospects of the Covid generation when given information about the losses that have occurred in the crisis.

Keywords: learning loss; labour market loss; crisis; social mobility; Covid-19 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: I24 J21 J62 J63 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2021-02
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-exp and nep-lab
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Working Paper: Unequal Learning and Labour Market Losses in the Crisis: Consequences for Social Mobility (2021) Downloads
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