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Mobile Phones and Economic Development in Africa

Jenny Aker
Authors registered in the RePEc Author Service: Isaac M. Mbiti

No 211, Working Papers from Center for Global Development

Abstract: We examine the growth of mobile phone technology over the past decade and consider its potential impacts upon quality of life in low-income countries, with a particular focus on sub-Saharan Africa. We first provide an overview of the patterns and determinants of mobile phone coverage in sub-Saharan Africa before describing the characteristics of primary and secondary mobile phone adopters on the continent. We then discuss the channels through which mobile phone technology can impact development outcomes, both as a positive externality of the communication sector and as part of mobile phone-based development projects, and analyze existing evidence. While current research suggests that mobile phone coverage and adoption have had positive impacts on agricultural and labor market efficiency and welfare in certain countries, empirical evidence is still somewhat limited. In addition, mobile phone technology cannot serve as the “silver bullet” for development in sub-Saharan Africa. Careful impact evaluations of mobile phone development projects are required to better understand their impacts upon economic and social outcomes, and mobile phone technology must work in partnership with other public good provision and investment.

Keywords: growth; economic development; poverty; income distribution; mobile phones; technology; sub-Saharan Africa (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 45 pages
Date: 2010-06
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-afr, nep-dev and nep-ict
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Citations: View citations in EconPapers (298) Track citations by RSS feed

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Journal Article: Mobile Phones and Economic Development in Africa (2010) Downloads
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