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Do Immigrants Displace Native Workers? Evidence from Matched Panel Data

Pedro S. Martins, Matloob Piracha and José Varejão
Authors registered in the RePEc Author Service: Jose Varejao (), Pedro Silva Martins and Matloob Piracha ()

No 44, Working Papers from Queen Mary, University of London, School of Business and Management, Centre for Globalisation Research

Abstract: Using matched employer-employee data, we analyse the impact of immigrants on natives’ employment in Portugal. Using different model specifications, we show that the natives and immigrants are ‘complements’ at most occupation levels, in the sense that both types are hired when the number of immigrants is increasing. Controlling for different skill-level groups as well as for temporary and permanent jobs, the estimates show that, contrary to the evidence from some existing literature, the natives at the lower end of the skills spectrum are not affected by the presence of immigrants as well. There is, however, some evidence that when the number of immigrants in the firm is decreasing, natives tend to replace immigrants.

Keywords: matched employer-employee data; displacement; immigrants. (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: J15 J61 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-lab, nep-lma, nep-mig and nep-ure
Date: 2013-10
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (1) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://webspace.qmul.ac.uk/pmartins/CGRWP44.pdf

Related works:
Journal Article: Do immigrants displace native workers? Evidence from matched panel data (2018) Downloads
Working Paper: Do Immigrants Displace Native Workers? Evidence from Matched Panel Data (2012) Downloads
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