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Technology-Skill Complementarity in Early Phases of Industrialization

Raphael Franck () and Oded Galor ()

No 11865, CEPR Discussion Papers from C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers

Abstract: The research explores the effect of industrialization on human capital formation. Exploiting exogenous regional variations in the adoption of steam engines across France, the study establishes that, in contrast to conventional wisdom that views early industrialization as a predominantly deskilling process, the industrial revolution was conducive for human capital formation, generating wide-ranging gains in literacy rates and educational attainment.

Keywords: Economic Growth; Human Capital; Industrialization; Steam Engine.; Technology-Skill Complementarity (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: N33 N34 O14 O33 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2017-02
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-gro, nep-his, nep-ino and nep-knm
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Working Paper: Technology-Skill Complementarity in Early Phases of Industrialization (2017) Downloads
Working Paper: Technology-Skill Complementarity in the Early Phase of Industrialization (2016) Downloads
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