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Understanding the Determinants of Financial Outcomes and Choices: The Role of Noncognitive Abilities

Gianpaolo Parise and Kim Peijnenburg

No 11900, CEPR Discussion Papers from C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers

Abstract: We explore how financial distress and choices are affected by noncognitive abilities. Our measures stem from research in psychology and economics. In a representative panel of households, we find that people in the bottom decile of noncognitive abilities are five times more likely to experience financial distress compared to those in the top decile. Relatedly, individuals with lower noncognitive abilities make financial choices that increase their likelihood of distress: They are less likely to plan for retirement and save, and more likely to buy impulsively and to have unsecured debt. Causality is shown using childhood trauma as an instrument.

Keywords: behavioral finance; financial choices; financial distress; Noncognitive abilities; psychology and economics; Saving; unsecured debt (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: D10 D14 G02 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-neu
Date: 2017-03
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