EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Power to the Periphery? The failure of Regional Convergence in Canada, 1890-2006

Chris Minns and Joan Rosés ()

No 12803, CEPR Discussion Papers from C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers

Abstract: Economic historians have long signalled the importance of location-specific resource booms in the Canadian development experience, but a full analysis of the dynamics of Canada's internal income dynamics is conspicuously absent. This article presents comprehensive estimates of regional inequality in Canada from 1890 to 2006 and assesses the sources of convergence and divergence across Canadian provinces. Our convergence decompositions support the central role of resource booms in accounting for regional income dynamics, and show that structural change contributing relatively little to the development process. Our findings are in sharp contrast to the historical experience of other countries, including the United States.

Keywords: Canada; random growth theory; Regional Inequality; resource booms; structural change (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: N91 N92 R12 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-his and nep-ure
Date: 2018-03
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.cepr.org/active/publications/discussion_papers/dp.php?dpno=12803 (application/pdf)
CEPR Discussion Papers are free to download for our researchers, subscribers and members. If you fall into one of these categories but have trouble downloading our papers, please contact us at subscribers@cepr.org

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:12803

Ordering information: This working paper can be ordered from
http://www.cepr.org/ ... rs/dp.php?dpno=12803

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in CEPR Discussion Papers from C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers Centre for Economic Policy Research, 33 Great Sutton Street, London EC1V 0DX.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by ().

 
Page updated 2019-04-04
Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:12803