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Human Capital Formation during the First Industrial Revolution: Evidence from the Use of Steam Engines

Alexandra de Pleijt (), Alessandro Nuvolari () and Jacob Weisdorf

No 12987, CEPR Discussion Papers from C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers

Abstract: We examine the effect of technical change on human capital formation during England's Industrial Revolution. Using the number of steam engines installed by 1800 as a synthetic indicator of technological change, and occupational statistics to measure working skills (using HISCLASS), we establish a positive correlation between the use of steam engines and the share of skilled workers at the county level. We use exogenous variation in carboniferous rock strata (containing coal to fuel the engines) to show that the effect was causal. While technological change stimulated the formation of working skills, it had an overall negative effect on the formation of primary education, captured by literacy and school enrolment rates. It also led to higher gender inequality in literacy.

Keywords: Economic Growth; education; Human Capital; Industrialisation; Steam Engines; Technological change (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: J82 N33 O14 O33 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-gro, nep-his, nep-ino and nep-lab
Date: 2018-06
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
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Working Paper: Human Capital Formation during the First Industrial Revolution: Evidence from the Use of Steam Engines (2016) Downloads
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