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The Economics of Hypergamy

Ingvild Almås, Andreas Kotsadam (), Espen R Moen and Knut Røed ()

No 13606, CEPR Discussion Papers from C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers

Abstract: Partner selection is a vital feature of human behavior with important consequences for indi-viduals, families, and society. Hypergamy occurs when a husband's earning capacity system-atically exceeds that of his wife. We provide a theoretical framework that rationalizes hy-pergamy even in the absence of gender differences in the distribution of earnings capacity. Using parental earnings rank, a predetermined measure of earnings capacity that solves the simultaneity problem of matching affecting earnings outcomes, we show that hypergamy is an important feature of Norwegian mating patterns. A vignette experiment identifies gender differences in preferences that can explain the observed patterns.

Keywords: gender identity; Household specialization; Labor Supply; Marriage (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: D10 J12 J22 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-evo
Date: 2019-03
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