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Distance Learning in Higher Education: Evidence from a Randomized Experiment

Maria Paula Cacault, Christian Hildebrand, Laurent-Lucchetti, Jérémy and Michele Pellizzari

No 13666, CEPR Discussion Papers from C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers

Abstract: Using a randomized experiment in a public Swiss university, we study the impact of online live streaming of lectures on student achievement and attendance. We find that (i) students use the live streaming technology only punctually, apparently when random events make attending in class too costly; (ii) attending lectures via live streaming lowers achievement for low-ability students and increases achievement for high-ability ones and (iii) offering live streaming reduces in-class attendance only mildly. These findings have important implications for the design of education policies.

Keywords: distance learning; EduTech; live streaming (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: I20 I21 I23 I26 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-exp and nep-knm
Date: 2019-04
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