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Political Effects of the Internet and Social Media

Ruben Enikolopov, Maria Petrova and Ekaterina Zhuravskaya ()

No 13996, CEPR Discussion Papers from C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers

Abstract: How do the internet and social media affect political outcomes? We review empirical evidence from the recent political economy literature focusing especially on the work that considers those features that distinguish the internet and social media from traditional offline media, such as low barriers to entry and reliance on user-generated content. We discuss the main results about the effects of the internet, in general, and social media, in particular, on voting, street protests, attitudes toward government, political polarization, xenophobia, and politicians' behavior. We also review evidence on the role of social media in the dissemination of false news and summarize results about the strategies employed by autocratic regimes to censor internet and to use social media for surveillance and propaganda. We conclude by highlighting the key open questions about how the internet and social media shape politics in democracies and autocracies.

Keywords: internet; social media; survey (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2019-09
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-pay, nep-pol and nep-soc
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Related works:
Working Paper: Political Effects of the Internet and Social Media (2020)
Working Paper: Political Effects of the Internet and Social Media (2020)
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