EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Trade and Innovation

Marc Melitz and Stephen Redding

No 16264, CEPR Discussion Papers from C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers

Abstract: Two central insights from the Schumpeterian approach to innovation and growth are that the pace of innovation is endogenously determined by the expectation of future profits and that growth is inherently a process of creative destruction. As international trade is a key determinant of firm profitability and survival, it is natural to expect it to play a key role in shaping both incentives to innovate and the rate of creative destruction. In this paper, we review the theoretical and empirical literature on trade and innovation. We highlight four key mechanisms through which international trade affects endogenous innovation and growth: (i) market size; (ii) competition; (iii) comparative advantage; (iv) knowledge spillovers. Each of these mechanisms offers a potential source of dynamic welfare gains in addition to the static welfare gains from trade from conventional trade theory. Recent research has suggested that these dynamic welfare gains from trade can be substantial relative to their static counterparts. Discriminating between alternative mechanisms for these dynamic welfare gains and strengthening the evidence on their quantitative magnitude remain exciting areas of ongoing research.

JEL-codes: F1 F43 O3 O4 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2021-06
References: Add references at CitEc
Citations:

Downloads: (external link)
https://cepr.org/publications/DP16264 (application/pdf)
CEPR Discussion Papers are free to download for our researchers, subscribers and members. If you fall into one of these categories but have trouble downloading our papers, please contact us at subscribers@cepr.org

Related works:
Working Paper: Trade and innovation (2021) Downloads
Working Paper: Trade and innovation (2021) Downloads
Working Paper: Trade and Innovation (2021) Downloads
Working Paper: Trade and Innovation (2021) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:16264

Ordering information: This working paper can be ordered from
https://cepr.org/publications/DP16264

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in CEPR Discussion Papers from C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers Centre for Economic Policy Research, 33 Great Sutton Street, London EC1V 0DX.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by ().

 
Page updated 2024-06-08
Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:16264