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Globalization and the demand for skill: An Export Based Channel

Eric Maurin (), David Thesmar and Mathias Thoenig ()

No 3406, CEPR Discussion Papers from C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers

Abstract: This Paper shows that international trade affects the demand for skill through an export-based channel. Our working hypothesis is that the very act of exporting requires an effort of skill upgrading, in particular among occupations related to marketing and development. Using firm level data, we estimate a model that breaks down production into two stages: product development and marketing, and actual production. Once we correct for biases arising from the endogeneity of export decision, we find strong support for our hypothesis. The skill requirement in development/marketing occupations increases with the share of exported output. Overall skill upgrading is as important among firms exporting to OECD countries as among those exporting outside of the OECD to the LDCs.

Keywords: exportations; labour demand; organization of production; trade (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: F16 J23 L23 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2002-06
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