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Monopoly Rights can Reduce Income Big Time

Berthold Herrendorf () and Arilton Teixeira ()

No 3854, CEPR Discussion Papers from C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers

Abstract: We study a two–sector version of the neoclassical growth model with coalitions of factor suppliers in the capital producing sectors. We show that if the coalitions have monopoly rights, then they block the adoption of the efficient technology. We also show that blocking leads to a decrease in the productivity of each capital producing sector and to an increase in the relative price of capital; as a result capital stock and production fall in each sector. We finally show that the implied fall in the level of per capita income can be large quantitatively.

Keywords: capital accumulation; monopoly rights; technology adoption; total factor productivity; vasted interests (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: E00 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2003-04
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Working Paper: Monopoly rights can reduce income big time (2004) Downloads
Working Paper: Monopoly rights can reduce income big time (2004)
Working Paper: Monopoly rights can reduce income big time (2004) Downloads
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