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International Migration of Couples

Martin Junge (), Martin Munk () and Panu Poutvaara ()
Additional contact information
Martin Junge: Danish Business Research Academy
Martin Munk: Centre for Mobility Research, Aalborg University

No 1519, CReAM Discussion Paper Series from Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London

Abstract: We develop a theoretical model regarding the migration of dual-earner couples and test it in the context of international migration. Our model predicts that the probability that a couple emigrates increases with the income of the primary earner, whereas the income of the secondary earner may affect the decision in either direction. We conduct an em-pirical analysis that uses population-wide administrative data from Denmark. The re-sults are consistent with our model. We find that primary earners in couples are more strongly self-selected with respect to income than single persons. This novel result counters the intuition that family ties weaken self-selection.

Keywords: International migration; Family migration; Education; Gender differences; Dual-earner couples (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: F22 J12 J16 J24 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2015-12
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http://www.cream-migration.org/publ_uploads/CDP_19_15.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
Working Paper: International Migration of Couples (2015) Downloads
Working Paper: International Migration of Couples (2014) Downloads
Working Paper: International Migration of Couples (2014) Downloads
Working Paper: International Migration of Couples (2014) Downloads
Working Paper: International Migration of Couples (2013) Downloads
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