EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Immigrants and Legal Status: Do Personal Contacts Matter?

Simone Cremaschi () and Carlo Devillanova
Additional contact information
Simone Cremaschi: European University Institute

No 1629, CReAM Discussion Paper Series from Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London

Abstract: This paper addresses the effect of personal contacts on immigrants’ legal status by focusing particularly on the contacts’ direct links to legal status and indirect associations with the labor market. The overall effect of these contacts is theoretically unsigned and likely to vary across contact type and contextual factors. Our empirical analysis, based on unique Italian survey data on both documented and undocumented immigrants, tests two hypotheses regarding native contacts: (i) that they are more likely to be associated with a higher immigrant documentation probability and (ii) that they are more likely to introduce immigrants to jobs that facilitate access to employment-based legalization initiatives. Our results indicate that contacts with both natives and family members have a direct, positive, and quantitatively large effect on immigrant documentation probability, whereas contacts with members of the same ethnic group only indirectly increase documentation probability by raising the probability of employment. Our findings also support the hypothesis that native contacts connect immigrants with better jobs.

Keywords: Immigrant integration; legal status; personal contacts; networks; labor market outcomes (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2016-12
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-eur, nep-mig and nep-soc
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
https://www.cream-migration.org/publ_uploads/CDP_29_16.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:crm:wpaper:1629

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in CReAM Discussion Paper Series from Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by CReAM Administrator () and Thomas Cornelissen ().

 
Page updated 2022-12-03
Handle: RePEc:crm:wpaper:1629