EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Is Habit a Powerful Policy Instrument to Induce Prosocial Behavioral Change?

Johann Caro-Burnett, Ahmed Mobarak () and Judith Chevalier ()
Additional contact information
Johann Caro-Burnett: Hiroshima University

No 2275, Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers from Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University

Abstract: Recent literature suggests the power of interventions to change habits. In a dense slum in Nairobi, we adopt best practices from the habit literature to encourage toilet use instead of alternatives that damage community health. Offering subsidies increased toilet usage, effects continue for one month after discounts end, but erode thereafter. Treatments designed to induce habit formation (marketing, time-limited discounts encouraging repetition, discounts for longer periods, targeting `habitual types’) generated no greater persistence. We see some persistent behavior change due to learning about the new toilet option. It appears difficult to induce pro-social behavior without private benefits through habit change.

Keywords: Behavioral Economics; Habit Formation; Kenya; Sanitation (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: D91 O12 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 36 pages
Date: 2021-02
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
https://cowles.yale.edu/sites/default/files/files/pub/d22/d2275.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:cwl:cwldpp:2275

Ordering information: This working paper can be ordered from
Cowles Foundation, Yale University, Box 208281, New Haven, CT 06520-8281 USA
The price is None.

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers from Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University Yale University, Box 208281, New Haven, CT 06520-8281 USA. Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Matthew Regan ().

 
Page updated 2021-10-15
Handle: RePEc:cwl:cwldpp:2275