EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Self-Confidence, Overconfidence and Prenatal Testosterone Exposure: Evidence from the Lab

Patricio Dalton () and Sayantan Ghosal

No 2014-020, SIRE Discussion Papers from Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE)

Abstract: This paper examines whether the degree of confidence and overconfidence in one's ability is determined biologically. In articular, we study whether foetal testosterone exposure correlates with an incentive-compatible measure of confidence within an experimental setting. We find that men (rather than women) who were exposed to high testosterone levels in their mother's womb are less likely to overestimate their actual performance, which in turn helps them to gain higher monetary rewards. Men exposed to low prenatal testosterone levels, instead, set unrealistically high expectations which results in self-defeating behaviour. These results from the lab are able to reconcile hitherto disconnected evidence from the field, by providing a link between traders'overconfidence bias, long-term financial returns and prenatal testosterone exposure.

Keywords: 2D:4D; testosterone; neuroeconomics; expectations; overcon dence; self-confidence; goals (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2014-02-09
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-cbe, nep-evo, nep-exp and nep-neu
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (4) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://hdl.handle.net/10943/564
Our link check indicates that this URL is bad, the error code is: 404 Not Found

Related works:
Working Paper: Self-Confidence, Overconfidence and Prenatal Testosterone Exposure: Evidence from the Lab (2014) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:edn:sirdps:564

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in SIRE Discussion Papers from Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE) 31 Buccleuch Place, EH8 9JT, Edinburgh. Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Research Office ().

 
Page updated 2024-01-05
Handle: RePEc:edn:sirdps:564